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                                             An Overview of Fall Army Worm

  • Fall Army Worm (FAW) is native to the tropical regions of the western hemisphere from the United States to Argentina.
  • Is susceptible to cold, and populations are thought to die out each winter
  • In tropical environment it normally overwinters successfully.
  • Is a strong flier, and disperses long distances annually during the summer months.
  • Fly and mate at night, after which the female will lay eggs.
  • The number of eggs per mass varies considerably but is often 100 to 200!
  • The fall armyworm has four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
  • worm1
  • ·         The life cycle is completed in about 30 days during the summer, but 60 days in the spring and autumn, and 80 to 90 days during the winter.

          Displays a very wide host range, with over 80 plants recorded, but clearly prefers grasses.

          When the larvae are very numerous they defoliate the preferred plants, acquire an "armyworm" habit and disperse in large numbers, consuming nearly all vegetation in their path.

          But, there is some evidence that fall armyworm strains exist, based primarily on their host plant preference.

          One strain feeds principally on corn, but also on sorghum, cotton and a few other hosts if they are found growing near the primary hosts.

          Displays a very wide host range, with over 80 plants recorded, but clearly prefers grasses.

          When the larvae are very numerous they defoliate the preferred plants, acquire an "armyworm" habit and disperse in large numbers, consuming nearly all vegetation in their path.

          But, there is some evidence that fall armyworm strains exist, based primarily on their host plant preference.

          One strain feeds principally on corn, but also on sorghum, cotton and a few other hosts if they are found growing near the primary hosts.

worm 2

 


       FAW caterpillars range from shades of brown to gray, green, or yellow-green.

      Their most distinguishing characteristic is a whitish inverted Y between the eyes

Damage

      Young larvae initially consume leaf tissue from one side, leaving the opposite epidermal layer intact.

      By the second or third instar, larvae begin to make holes in leaves, and eat from the edge of the leaves inward. Feeding in the whorl of corn often produces a characteristic row of perforations in the leaves.

      Moist sawdust-like frass near the whorl and upper leaves of the plant

 

worm 3

 

·         Larval densities are usually reduced to one to two per plant when larvae feed in close proximity to one another, due to cannibalistic behaviour.

·         Larvae also will burrow into the growing point destroying the growth potential of plants, or clipping the leaves. Burrows into the ear, feeding on kernels in the same manner as corn earworm.

·         Unlike corn earworm, which tends to feed down through the silk before attacking the kernels at the tip of the ear, FAW feeds by burrowing through the husk on the side of the ear.

worm 4

 

      Early feeding can appear to be similar to European corn borer damage; however ECB larvae bore into the stalk whereas FAW larvae continue to feed on the foliage making larger more ragged holes!

      The earliest instars, one to four, eat relatively little leaf material, while the fifth and sixth larval stages eat over 90 percent of the total foliage the armyworm will consume over its life span.

      Caterpillars feed throughout the day but are typically most active early in the morning and late in the evening. They can often be observed easily at these times.


PROGRESS IN AFRICA-ETHIOPIA-AMHARA
Environmental warming?  Through shipment? Ocean current ?

worm 5

 

·         Occurred: before a month to Ethiopia

·         Before two weeks to Amhara region

·         West Gojjam before two weeks; Now reportedly in East and West Gojjam; Awi and South Gondar and likely to turn up in the neighboring zones

 

Preventive measures

       Deep plough expose pupa to the surface

       Adjust planting time (early or late) needs studies on the population dynamics and over wintering behavior

      Destroy alternate hosts and crop residue to disrupt the lifecycle.

Monitoring Measures

      Set up pheromone trap at the beginning of the growing season.

      Examine plants for typical early damage signs of FAW: small ‘window pane’ holes -to large ragged and elongated holes on the leaves emerging from the whorl.

      Identify it is the FAW

Act

      Hand pick egg mass and larvae and destroy

      Neem based pesticides

      Biopesticieds –BT- Azawi

      Alternate use of pesticides such as Coragen 200 SC/Chlorantraniliprole/, Basudin 600 EW/ Diazinon/, Dursban 240 ULV/chloropyrifos-ethyl/, Malathion 50% EC/Ethiolathion/ and others in the evening and dawn

 

What is happening?

 

      Training and orientation: scouting, identification and control from Zonal to grass root

      Setting up pheromone trap at various zones.

      Handpicking egg-mass and larvae and destroying

      Mobilization of resources for monitoring & control: pheromone trap; pesticides; sprayers; technical expertise

      Awareness creation through mass media!

      Mass mobilization: schools, civil servants etc….

      Close collaboration between the federal and regional government!

      Efforts going on to bring other parties on board!

 

 

 

 

An Overview of Fall Army Worm

      Fall Army Worm (FAW) is native to the tropical regions of the western hemisphere from the United States to Argentina.

       Is susceptible to cold, and populations are thought to die out each winter

      In tropical environment it normally overwinters successfully.

      Is a strong flier, and disperses long distances annually during the summer months.

      Fly and mate at night, after which the female will lay eggs.

      The number of eggs per mass varies considerably but is often 100 to 200!

      The fall armyworm has four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

 
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                                                              New Crop Varieties Released

Five new improved crop varieties have been released in 2017. These varieties are, 1 on teff, 1 on sorghum, 1 on haricot bean, 1 on field pea and 1 on food barley. The new varieties are the outcome of the unreserved effort of team of researchers from Adet, Sirinka, Sekota and Gonder. These varieties were approved by the National Variety Releasing Committee after a number of parameters have been taken into consideration. The new technologies are believed to generate foreign income for the region as well as for the country and contribute much for food security. The institute would like to extend its appreciation to the research centers for their remarkable achievements and wishes them the best in their future endeavors.

Crop type and local name

Released by

Average yield

Q/ha

Adaptation

ecology

Yield advantage (%)

Characteristic features

Teff   (Hibre)

Adet ARC

25

Performs best in areas like Sirinka, Alem Ketema and other similar places except Sekota

25% yield increment from the standard check and 47% from thelocal check

White in color and early maturing

Sorghum (Alene)

Sirinka ARC

47.17

Performs best in areas like Kobo, Chefa, Jarie and other moisture stressed areas

8.6% yield increment from the standard check and 41% from the local check

Relatively tolerates bird attack and logging

Haricot bean (Fetne)

Sirinka ARC

22.01

Best in Shewarobit, Sirinka, Jarie, Kobo and in other areas below 1850 m.a.s.l.

 

Early maturing and preferable in markets

Field pea (Yewagnesh)

Sekota DRC

22.92

Suitable for North Wello, Waghimra and other similar places

14% yield increment from the standard check and 45% from the local check

 

Food barley (Debark 1)

Gonder ARC

46.81

Suitable for all highland barley growing woredas

18% yield increment from the standard check

White seed color and medium resistance to spot blotch

 

 
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                                                             Training Given on Ethics and Corruption

Following the direction given by ANRS Ethics and Anticorruption Commission, the Amhara Agricultural Research Institute (ARARI) provided training on ethics and corruption to its employees on the 9th and 12th of June 2017. The training covered many topics such as the definition of ethics, the importance of dealing with ethics, the difference between ethic and ethics, types of ethics, work ethics, works standards expected from employees, the effects of absenteeism. Furthermore, themes like the definition of corruption, causes of corruption, effects of corruption, preventive measures, inappropriate and appropriate acts in government organizations, misconducts commonly occurring in workplace, factors contributing for misbehaviors and their aggravation, the consequences of misbehavior and their solutions, points to be considered when measures taken on wrongdoings and ways to build personal ethics have been presented and discussed thoroughly.

                      corruption                                                                           

Last Updated ( Thursday, 15 June 2017 10:52 )
 
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                                                                                    Development Agents Trained

The International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA) is one of the 15 research centers under Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research (CGIAR) working in Ethiopia on various agricultural projects with the aim of increasing farmers’ production and productivity. Improving Agricultural Extension System for Wider Adoption of Technologies is one of the projects that has been executed in Ethiopia in 4 woredas of the Amhara region namely Gozamin, Debreelias, Basoliben and Machakel since November 2017. Conversant to this, ICARDA in collaboration with the Amhra Agricultural Research Institute (ARARI) and Boku University of Austria trained over 88 Development Agents for 6 consecutive days in Debre Markos at Gozamin hotel from May 29 to June 3, 2017. The training constituting various topics of agricultural sciences was given to the trainees as refresher to help them implement the new extension approach (completely randomized social experiment) in the aforementioned wheat growing woredas of East Gojam Administrative Zone.

The training covered crop production which includes wheat, teff, maize, pulse: livestock husbandry that consists of forage, small ruminant production, dairy, poultry, fish and health; soil and water management that comprises of soil fertility, agricultural water management and soil conservation and extension communication that incorporates themes like participatory extension, why should we move from teacher to coach?, basics of communication, what is coaching, what is mentoring: differences and complementarities, how to set up the coaching process, notes on methods and practical implications.

Finally, to let the trainees bind the theoritical knowledge with practice, the training has been accompanied by role play where some of the development agents acted as farmers and some others acted as development agents.

                                                                                       agen

                                                                                                  

 

 
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                                                                   Ginbot 20 Victory Day Celebrated

The Amhara Agricultural Research Institute (ARARI) celebrated the 26th Ginbot 20 victory day on May 26, 2017 with a panel discussion held at the conference hall of the institute in the presence of over 60 employees working in different directorates. The document which was prepared centrally for the panel discussion and sent to the regions for the celebration of the downfall of the derge regime, the conquest of power by the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) and the people was presented by Ato Mulugeta Alemayehu, Public Relation Directorate director of ARARI.

During the panel discussion, topics such as constitutional system; constitutionalism; peculiar features of the Ethiopian constitution; general features of federalism; the FDRE constitution basic objectives, principles, values and the conviction of building of multinational system, and the successes of the Ethiopian Federal System in the building up of democratic unity were presented and discussed.

genbot 20

 

 
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